Juicing Fast for Mind, Body and Soul

Juicing Fast for Mind, Body and Soul

A juice fast is exactly what it sounds like.  For any number of days, a person consumes nothing but freshly produced juice.  A juice fast is said to help detoxify a person’s body, and is sometimes combined with a high intake of water.  Always, a person eats no food during a juice fast.  Proponents of the juice fast claim that our bodies collect toxins from a lifetime of being exposed to and ingesting them, and a juice fast helps to rid the body of these accumulating toxins.

Juice fasting is not a new concept.  Since the dawn of mankind, people have fasted for various reasons in various ways, from bodily cleansing to spiritual enlightenment and penance for sins.  It is evident from existing records that abstinence, either partial or complete, from all food or from certain foods, existed in Assyria, Babylon, China, Greece, India, Palestine, Persia and Rome.  Records from the early civilizations of Mesopotamia and Egypt indicate that fasting was also an important part of their religious practices.
Juicing Fast
Much of the history of fasting is associated with religion. There are over 30 references to fasting in the Bible, and there are numerous references to fasting among non-Christian religious groups. As a religious observance, fasting has been practiced since recorded history began, and, as a practice,  it undoubtedly preceded recorded history.  Fasting is believed to be looked upon kindly by God, and it is also believed to create a clairvoyance in a person’s mind that brings them closer to God and the spiritual realm.

In modern times, many religions still perform sacred fasts of one form or another.  But, in modern times, non religious people have begun fasting for health and heightened intellectual prowess.  It is said that abstaining from food and drink for a few days rids a person’s body of toxins and clears their brains, making for a crisper intellect and a cleaner internal body.  Without fasting, health proponents say our body toxins build up, slow us down, spread disease through our bodies, and eventually kill us prematurely.  A regular, sensible fast can keep a person in good health.

However, many doctors and psychologists firmly believe that fasting is bad for people.  The perceived feeling of heightened intellect, they say, is actually your brain going into starvation mode, dehydrated.  The bodily toxins, they say, are not so significant as to make that possible benefit of a fast outweigh the negative side effect of a metabolism put out of whack by repeated fasting.  Psychologists also believe that many people with eating disorders will use fasts as a disguise for maintaining low weights, and will prolong the problems of poor body image and lead to long term bodily damage from starvation.

A  juice fast, many say, makes the danger of dehydration and metabolic change less severe.  Since the body is still getting calories, and most Americans have some extra weight to spare, a juice diet is only beneficial, and the criticisms of fasting do not apply to juice fasting.  The body receives a  minimum daily intake of vitamins and minerals, and the juices help to detoxify the body.

Whether for religious reasons or for a person’s health, fasts, including a juice fast, are not going to go away.  It is important for a faster to know how to fast and for how long, and which types of juice are best for a juice fast.  Juice fasting can help keep a person healthy when it is done right.